Dance News Feedhttp://dance.wisc.edu/This is the News RSS Feed for the Dance Department in the School of Education at the University of Wisconsin - Madison.urn:uuid:40b8c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/10/18/wisconsin-minnesota-partnership-receives--6-3m-award-to-advance-use-of-evidence-based-education-practices Wisconsin-Minnesota partnership receives $6.3M award to advance use of evidence-based education practicesA new collaboration of Wisconsin and Minnesota education researchers formed to support education priorities in each state has won a five-year, $6.3 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education. The project's goal is to improve the academic achievement of elementary and secondary school students in the two-state region by advancing the use of evidence-based practices. Researchers from each state’s flagship university, the University of Wisconsin−Madison and University of Minnesota, joined with Education Analytics, a Madison, Wisconsin-based education nonprofit, to develop the winning proposal.Fri, 18 Oct 2019 14:35:35 Z<p>A new collaboration of Wisconsin and Minnesota education researchers formed to support education priorities in each state has won a five-year, $6.3 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education. The&nbsp;project's goal is to improve the academic achievement of elementary and secondary school students in the two-state region by advancing the use of&nbsp;evidence-based practices.&nbsp;</p> <p>Researchers from each state&rsquo;s flagship university, the University of Wisconsin&minus;Madison and University of Minnesota, joined with Education Analytics, a Madison, Wisconsin-based education nonprofit, to develop the winning proposal.</p> <p><img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/evidence-banner61b9c237c0a569e0ad6dff0000cdac6d.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Wisconsin-Minnesota partnership banner" title="evidence-banner" class="FloatImageRight" />&ldquo;We are thrilled with the opportunity to build the U.S. Department of Education Wisconsin&minus;Minnesota Comprehensive Center (WMCC) in support of educators in both states,&rdquo; said Steve Kimball, principal investigator for the new center and a senior researcher at the <a href="https://www.wcer.wisc.edu/" title="WCER website" target="_blank">Wisconsin Center for Education Research (WCER)</a> within UW&minus;Madison&rsquo;s School of Education.</p> <p>&ldquo;This award brings together a diverse team of experts in areas such as professional learning, evaluation, school leadership, special education, and data analytics to help local, state, and regional educators adopt and refine practices to better serve students.&rdquo;</p> <p>Members of WMCC have extensive experience working with Wisconsin and Minnesota state education agencies, regional education support organizations, professional associations, and school districts to translate research into practical applications.</p> <p>&ldquo;Most recently,&rdquo; says Kim Gibbons, a WMCC co-director based at the Center for Applied Research and Educational Improvement at the University of Minnesota, &ldquo;we have examined data and engaged with stakeholders of both states to hear about their needs as well as opportunities on which to build a shared knowledge base. We see the center as the start of a new era of cross-state collaboration.&rdquo;</p> <p> &ldquo;We believe we can and must do better at eliminating educational disparities by increasing opportunities for all students and their families,&rdquo; states Alisia Moutry, a WMCC co-director based at UW&minus;Madison. &ldquo;Our capacity-building services will help our region address significant and ongoing achievement gaps between student groups based on race, poverty, special education, and English language proficiency.&rdquo;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/wmccphoto1a7ab9c237c0a569e0ad6dff0000cdac6d.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="WMCC" displaymode="Original" title="wmccphoto1a" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">UW&ndash;Madison's Alisia Moutry, a co-director of the new<br /> WMCC, facilitates a training session on evidence-based<br /> practices for the Wisconsin Urban Leadership Institute.<br /> </figcaption> </figure> </div> While Minnesota and Wisconsin have historically ranked in the top third of all states for education quality, both states have persistently experienced large achievement gaps, particularly for students of color and those identified for special education services.&nbsp;</p> <p>Education Analytics, the third member of the partnership, has also provided research and capacity-building support services within both states and nationally.&nbsp;&ldquo;Our team offers experience implementing evidence-based practices, providing analytic and capacity-building support to the largest education systems in the country,&rdquo; explains WMCC Deputy Director Ernest Morgan, who also leads communications and development for the nonprofit.</p> <p>Based on the data the WMCC team gathered and analyzed to construct its proposal, the partnership intends to focus on key priorities identified by its state and regional stakeholders. They are:</p> <ul style="list-style-type: disc;"> <li>developing a single, comprehensive needs assessment to identify strengths and opportunities for improvement.</li> <li>building and sustaining continuous improvement processes, including strategic planning and identification of evidence-based practices and how to implement them.</li> <li>understanding how to better support and retain effective teachers and leaders in high-needs urban and rural schools.</li> <li>identifying high-quality educational choices for students in rural and low-income communities.</li> <li>maintaining a strong focus on educational equity.</li> </ul> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/wmmcimage3a-1.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="WMMC" displaymode="Original" title="wmmcimage3a-1" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Kim Gibbons, director of the Center for Applied<br /> Research and Educational Improvement at the<br /> University of Minnesota, will&nbsp;serve&nbsp;with&nbsp;Moutry as<br /> a co-director of the new WMCC.<br /> </figcaption> </figure> </div> The WMCC will jointly engage the Wisconsin Department of Public Instruction and the Minnesota Department of Education in an annual process to construct work plans to advance the priorities. As one of 19 regional comprehensive centers,&nbsp;the WMCC also will work with other regions and a national comprehensive center&nbsp;to share promising practices and leverage additional resources to deliver regional priorities.</p> <p>&ldquo;We look forward to working collaboratively with the other regional comprehensive centers, as well as the national center and U.S. Department of Education,&rdquo; states Kimball.&nbsp;&ldquo;We want to see all regions &lsquo;get better at getting better&rsquo; so that students are getting a world-class education that prepares them for lifelong success.&rdquo;</p> <p>The Department of Education's Comprehensive Centers Program&nbsp;is designed to provide high quality and intensive capacity-building services to help state education agencies and their clients identify, implement, and sustain evidence-based practices to support education outcomes pursuant to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, as amended by the Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015.</p> <style type="text/css"> p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px 'Helvetica Neue'} </style> <style type="text/css"> p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px 'Helvetica Neue'} </style>urn:uuid:d8b8c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/10/17/bird-bear-named-uw-madison-s-first-director-of-tribal-relations Bird Bear named UW–Madison’s first director of tribal relationsAaron Bird Bear, a skilled administrator with extensive professional experience in Native Nations issues, has been named to the new position of tribal relations director at UW–Madison. A UW alumnus, Bird Bear currently is the School of Education’s assistant dean for student diversity programs. He will transition to his new role Nov. 1.Thu, 17 Oct 2019 14:53:51 Z<p>Aaron Bird Bear, a skilled administrator with extensive professional experience on Native Nations issues, has been named to the newly created full-time position of tribal relations director at the University of Wisconsin&ndash;Madison.</p> <p>Bird Bear, a UW&ndash;Madison alumnus, currently serves as the School of Education&rsquo;s assistant dean for student diversity programs. In his new role, he will work to foster strong ties between the 12 First Nations of Wisconsin and the university and represent the UW&ndash;Madison Division of Extension leadership in collaborations with tribal communities. He will transition to his new role Nov. 1.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/aaron-bird-bear-hi-res.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Bird Bear" displaymode="Original" title="Aaron Bird Bear hi res" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption"> Bird Bear </figcaption> </figure> </div> &ldquo;Strengthening our relationships with the First Nations of Wisconsin is one of our highest priorities, and we are excited that someone of Aaron&rsquo;s experience and knowledge has agreed to help us advance this effort in partnership with the American Indian nations and communities of Wisconsin,&rdquo; says Chancellor Rebecca Blank. &ldquo;Aaron is a recognized leader who brings to this role an acute awareness of the university&rsquo;s history on Native issues and a deep understanding of the work that needs to be done.&rdquo;</p> <p>This is the first time in the university&rsquo;s history it has had a director of tribal relations. At least 14 other universities have similar positions, most of them in western states. The national search to fill the position was led by Larry Nesper, a UW&ndash;Madison professor of anthropology and American Indian Studies and director of the&nbsp;American Indian Studies Program.</p> <p>The position will be part of the Office of University Relations, which is responsible for building relationships with a variety of internal and external audiences including community organizations, business and industry, and elected officials in federal, state, local, and now tribal governments.</p> <p>&ldquo;We are pleased to be partnering with the Division of Extension in the creation of this new and important position,&rdquo; says Ben Miller, assistant vice chancellor for government and corporate affairs. &ldquo;Aaron is recognized as a partner and advocate by many tribal communities, and is someone who has previously provided critical leadership and guidance to university administrators on topics impacting our campus and the Native Nations of Wisconsin.&rdquo;</p> <p>Bird Bear, a citizen of the Mandan, Hidatsa &amp; Din&eacute; nations (enrolled in the Three Affiliated Tribes of the Fort Berthold Reservation), earned a bachelor&rsquo;s degree in physical oceanography from the University of Washington in Seattle in 1995 and a master&rsquo;s degree in educational leadership and policy analysis from UW&ndash;Madison in 2010.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageLeft"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/ho_chunk_dedication19_4344-500x333.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Bird Bear Ho Chunk Dedication" displaymode="Original" title="Ho_Chunk_Dedication19_4344-500x333" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Aaron Bird Bear helps Demetria Abangan-Brown Eagle<br /> create a crayon rubbing on paper from the "Our Shared<br /> Future" plaque on Bascom Hill.</figcaption> </figure> </div> He came to UW&ndash;Madison in 2000 as the American Indian Student Academic Services coordinator in the College of Letters &amp; Science. Since 2009, he has worked in the School of Education, most recently as an assistant dean responsible for leadership around recruiting, supporting and retaining historically underrepresented undergraduate and graduate students. His role as an assistant dean has included overseeing the College Access Program for high school students and the American Indian Curriculum Services unit, which coordinates the school&rsquo;s efforts to integrate American Indian studies into teacher education programs.</p> <p>In 2003, Bird Bear helped develop the First Nations Cultural Landscape Tour, a place-based, experiential education tour of American Indian landmarks on the UW&ndash;Madison campus. He currently co-leads a group that is creating signs honoring the Native presence on campus, including the new&nbsp;<a href="https://oursharedfuture.wisc.edu/">&ldquo;Our Shared Future&rdquo;</a>&nbsp;marker on Bascom Hill that recognizes the land as the ancestral home of the Ho-Chunk.</p> <p>&ldquo;My interest in this position comes from my deep admiration of the 12 First Nations of Wisconsin and my belief in the Wisconsin Idea and the transformational power of the University of Wisconsin&ndash;Madison,&rdquo; Bird Bear says. &ldquo;I sincerely embrace the tenets of respect, revitalization and reconciliation forwarded by Indigenous scholars as I begin to collaborate on behalf of UW&ndash;Madison with the Native American nations and communities of Wisconsin.&rdquo;</p>urn:uuid:68b8c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/10/17/nearly-300-books-by-award-winning-author-kate-dicamillo-being-delivered-to-wisconsin-districts Nearly 300 books by award-winning author Kate DiCamillo being delivered to Wisconsin districtsWith backing from Kate DiCamillo, staff from the Teacher Education Center within UW-Madison’s School of Education are delivering nearly 300 books by the award-winning author to several districts around Wisconsin. DiCamillo is presenting the 2019 Charlotte Zolotow Lecture, sponsored by the Cooperative Children’s Book Center (CCBC), on Thursday in the Overture Center’s Capitol Theater. At DiCamillo’s request, her honorarium for this appearance is being used to buy copies of her newest book — “Beverly, Right Here.”Thu, 17 Oct 2019 14:00:00 Z<p>With backing from Kate DiCamillo, staff from the <a href="https://tec.education.wisc.edu/" title="Visit the Teacher Education Center website" target="_blank">Teacher Education Center</a>&nbsp;within UW-Madison&rsquo;s School of Education are delivering nearly 300 books by the award-winning author to several districts around Wisconsin.</p> <p>DiCamillo is presenting the 2019 Charlotte Zolotow Lecture, sponsored by the <a href="https://ccbc.education.wisc.edu/" title="Visit the CCBC Website" target="_blank">Cooperative Children&rsquo;s Book Center (CCBC)</a>, on Thursday in the Overture Center&rsquo;s Capitol Theater. At DiCamillo&rsquo;s request, her honorarium for this appearance is being used to buy copies of her newest book &mdash; &ldquo;Beverly, Right Here.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;Kate&rsquo;s generosity is commendable,&rdquo; says KT Horning, director of the CCBC. &ldquo;She has never forgotten how important books were to her when she was young, and she is always looking for ways to get books directly into the hands of other children who might need them as much as she did as a child.&rdquo;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/beloit-mcneal-intermediate-school.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Beloit-McNeal Intermediate School" displaymode="Original" title="Beloit-McNeal Intermediate School" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Students and staff associated with Beloit's McNeel<br /> Intermediate School pose for a photo after receiving copies<br /> of "Beverly, Right Here." Top row, left-to-right: Brandy<br /> Grady, district librarian; Tara Scott, student with UW-SET<br /> program; Dr. Stanley Munro, superintendent, School District<br /> of Beloit; Tessa Neigum, UW-SET program coordinator; and<br /> Michelle Hendrix-Nora, principal, McNeel Intermediate.<br /> Middle row, left-to-right: Marcus Beltran, Lanasia Dubois,<br /> Jasiah Doyle, and Yescenia Zariana. Bottom, left-to-right:<br /> Kaiyannah Brown, James Ford, Adrianne Sanderson, Alayjah<br /> Fleming, Edgar Solano-Bolanos, and Dominise Ashford.</figcaption> </figure> </div> These books are being distributed to seventh graders and libraries in districts associated with a new special education teacher residency program (UW-SET) being piloted by the School of Education. This new program is designed for students who are interested in completing a year-long student teaching experience in one of eight partnering school districts. Interested students must commit to teaching for at least three years in one of these districts. </p> <p>Tessa Neigum, UW-SET program coordinator, is hand-delivering the books. The Wisconsin districts participating in this program, where the books are being delivered to, are: Adams-Friendship Area School District; Beloit School District; Cambria-Friesland School District; Juda School District; Royall School District; Seneca Area School District; Wauzeka-Steuben School District; and Wonewoc-Union Center School District. (For complete details about the program, visit: <a href="https://tec.education.wisc.edu/uw-set-residency-program/" title="Learn more via this web page" target="_blank">https://tec.education.wisc.edu/uw-set-residency-program/</a>.)</p> <p>&ldquo;We are very appreciative of our relationship with UW-Madison and author Kate DiCamillo&rsquo;s generosity in providing our intermediate students with copies of her new book, &ldquo;Beverly, Right Here,&rsquo; &rdquo; says Dr. Stanley Munro, superintendent of the School District of Beloit. &ldquo;As a forward-looking district, we must build in our students a strong foundation in literacy so that they are able to realize their full academic potential. This donation only reinforces this commitment to our students.&rdquo;</p> <p>DiCamillo&rsquo;s 45-minute Zolotow Lecture Thursday night, &ldquo;What Stories Have Given Me,&rdquo; is part of this year&rsquo;s Wisconsin Book Festival. The event, which begins at 7:30 p.m., is free and open to the public, with no tickets required.</p> <p>DiCamillo &mdash; an author of numerous books for young people &mdash; was born in Philadelphia but grew up in Florida. She moved to Minnesota in her 20s, with homesickness and a bitter winter leading her to write, &ldquo;Because of Winn-Dixie,&rdquo; her first published novel that became a best-seller and earned her a Newbery honor.<br /> <br /> From there, DiCamillo has gone on to explore settings as varied as a medieval castle and a magician&rsquo;s theater while continuing to enjoy great success, winning two Newbery Medals &mdash; for &ldquo;The Tale of Despereaux&rdquo; and &ldquo;Flora &amp; Ulysses&rdquo; &mdash; and being named National Ambassador for Young People&rsquo;s Literature.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/kate_2017-30.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Kate DiCamillo" displaymode="Original" title="Kate_2017-30" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">DiCamillo </figcaption> </figure> </div> DiCamillo&rsquo;s most recent trio of interrelated novels (&ldquo;Raymie Nightingale,&rdquo; &ldquo;Louisiana&rsquo;s Way Home,&rdquo; and &ldquo;Beverly, Right Here&rdquo;) return to the South of her childhood, and are her most autobiographical. Each one features one of three friends facing specific life challenges. Her books&rsquo; themes of hope and belief amid impossible circumstances and their messages of shared humanity and connectedness have resonated with readers of all ages around the world.</p> <p>DiCamillo today has nearly 30 million books in print across the globe.</p> <p>Established in 1998, the lecture was named to honor Charlotte Zolotow, a distinguished children's book editor for 38 years with Harper Junior Books, and author of more than 65 picture books, including such classic works as &ldquo;Mr. Rabbit and the Lovely Present&rdquo; and &ldquo;William's Doll.&rdquo; Zolotow attended UW&ndash;Madison on a writing scholarship from 1933-36 and she studied with Professor Helen C. White. The CCBC administers the event, which each year brings a distinguished children's book author or illustrator to the campus to deliver a free public lecture.</p> <p>This free public event is sponsored by UW&ndash;Madison&rsquo;s Cooperative Children&rsquo;s Book Center (CCBC), the Wisconsin Book Festival, and the Friends of the CCBC, Inc.</p> <p>The CCBC is a unique examination, study and research library housed in the School of Education. Its noncirculating collections include current, retrospective and historical books published for children and young adults. A vital gathering place for books, ideas and expertise, the CCBC is committed to identifying excellent literature for children and adolescents and bringing this literature to the attention of those adults who have an academic, professional or career interest in connecting young readers with books.<br /> <br /> <div class="FloatImageLeft"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/default-album/wauzeka-steuben.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Wauzeka-Steuben School District" displaymode="Original" title="Wauzeka-Steuben" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Tessa Neigum, UW-SET program coordinator, also delivered copies of "Beverly, Right Here,"<br /> to the Wauzeka-Steuben School District.&nbsp;</figcaption> </figure> </div> <br /> <br /> <br /> </p>urn:uuid:45b7c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/10/16/research-from-uw-madison-s-winterstein-helps-id-factor-in-concussion-reporting Research from UW-Madison's Winterstein helps ID factor in concussion reportingA story ​out of the University of Georgia explains new research on sport-related concussions (SRC) that's co-authored by UW-Madison’s Andrew Winterstein and Dee Warmath, a former faculty member at UW-Madison. Warmath and Winterstein's study — which was published in the journal Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach — reveals that knowing how to report a concussion may be a greater factor in prompting athletes to take action than concussion and symptom knowledge. Wed, 16 Oct 2019 14:44:42 Z<p>A <a href="https://news.uga.edu/research-factor-improve-concussion-reporting/" title="Learn more here" target="_blank">story ​out of the University of Georgia</a> explains new research on sport-related concussions (SRC) that's co-authored by UW-Madison&rsquo;s Andrew Winterstein and Dee Warmath, a former faculty member at UW-Madison.&nbsp; <br /> <br /> Warmath and Winterstein's study &mdash; &nbsp;which was published in the journal Sports Health: A Multidisciplinary Approach &mdash; reveals that knowing how to report a concussion may be a greater factor in prompting athletes to take action than concussion and symptom knowledge.&nbsp;</p> <p>Though a critical element of recovery from a concussion is early reporting, studies suggest 50 percent or more of concussion symptoms are concealed by the individual. While there have been many initiatives to encourage SRC awareness, most of these initiatives did not consider reporting skill.&nbsp;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/andrew-wintersteinf7b7c237c0a569e0ad6dff0000cdac6d.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Winterstein" displaymode="Original" title="ANDREW WINTERSTEIN" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Winterstein </figcaption> </figure> </div> In their paper, Warmath and Winterstein develop a scale for reporting skill, which is defined as mastery of the actions required to report a concussion. This includes knowing when you don&rsquo;t know enough to act and need to seek more information, a component that has proven significant in areas like sexual harassment reporting, whistleblowing, and financial wellness.&nbsp;</p> <p>To identify issues with concussion reporting, Warmath and Winterstein surveyed a national sample of 1,305 active adults aged 18 to 24 who participated in a variety of sports and activities at different levels of competition. Participants were shown a reporting skill scale and asked to rate how well each statement described them.&nbsp;</p> <p>The results suggest that a combination of reporting skill and concussion symptom knowledge offers the most promising solution to increased SRC reporting. According to UGA, the objective is to familiarize the steps of reporting so that when the time comes, obstacles associated with lack of skill and self-efficacy are removed.<br /> <br /> Winterstein is a distinguished clinical professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a href="https://kinesiology.education.wisc.edu/" title="Visit the Kinesiology home page" target="_blank">Department of Kinesiology</a>, where he directs the university&rsquo;s highly regarded&nbsp;<a href="https://kinesiology.education.wisc.edu/at/" title="Visit the Athletic Training Program home page" target="_blank">Athletic Training Program</a>. He also is an athletic trainer with University Health Services, and holds affiliate appointments with the UW School of Medicine and Public Health and the Department of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Warmath, who is the lead author on the paper, is an assistant professor in the College of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Georgia.<br /> <br /> Visit <a href="https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1177/1941738119856609" title="Winterstein, Warmath study" target="_blank">this</a> link to read the original study.</p>urn:uuid:35b7c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/10/16/wpr-features-expertise-of-uw-madison-s-albers-in-report-on-education-and-health WPR features expertise of UW–Madison's Albers in report on education and healthA recent Wisconsin Public Radio (WPR) report on the relationship between education and health features the expertise of UW-Madison’s Craig Albers, an associate professor with the Department of Educational Psychology. The WPR story focuses on the success of Algoma, a small city in Kewaunee County which has climbed in health rankings since 2008. Albers has traveled to different parts of Wisconsin to ask school officials and parents what obstacles they face in education. He shares with WPR that “the most frequently mentioned issue is mental and behavioral health.”Wed, 16 Oct 2019 11:42:00 Z<p>A recent Wisconsin Public Radio (WPR) report on the relationship between education and health features the expertise of UW-Madison&rsquo;s Craig Albers. &nbsp;</p> <p>Albers is an associate professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://edpsych.education.wisc.edu/" title="Ed Psych website" target="_blank">Department of Educational Psychology</a>. He also co-directs the <a href="https://reric.wisc.edu/" title="RERIC website" target="_blank">Rural Education Research&nbsp;&nbsp;and Implementation Center</a>&nbsp;(RERIC), a first-of-its-kind center in Wisconsin dedicated to improving educational outcomes for rural students, families, and schools through rigorous, partnership-based research. RERIC is housed within the <a href="https://www.wcer.wisc.edu/" title="WCER website" target="_blank">Wisconsin Center for Education Research</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/albers-craig-250-px-sq.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Craig Albers" displaymode="Original" title="albers-craig-250 px SQ" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Albers </figcaption> </figure> </div> The WPR story focuses on the success of Algoma, Wisconsin, a small city in Kewaunee County which has climbed in health rankings since 2008, even receiving the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Culture of Health Prize in 2017.<br /> <br /> With the close of a major business and unmet mental health needs of elementary students, Algoma began to implement changes to revitalize community health. They invested in a community wellness center, and sought to fill the social and emotional needs of students through mentoring programs.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> According to WPR, behavioral health and lack of access to counselors is an issue across the state, but can be particularly acute in rural areas.</p> <p>Albers has traveled to different parts of Wisconsin to ask school officials and parents what obstacles they face in education. He shares with WPR that &ldquo;the most frequently mentioned issue is mental and behavioral health.&rdquo;<br /> <br /> Read the full report from WPR <a href="https://www.wpr.org/wisconsin-communities-look-education-improve-healtha" title="WPR report" target="_blank">here</a>.</p>urn:uuid:b9b0c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/10/14/middle-school-absences-send-important-signal Middle School absences send important signalA new report from the Madison Education Partnership finds that rather than causing students to do poorly in school, unexcused absences may be signals of significant challenges in students’ lives. To respond, the Madison Metropolitan School District (MMSD) is working to understand and act on those signals.Mon, 14 Oct 2019 09:39:00 Z<p>A new report from the Madison Education Partnership finds that rather than&nbsp;<em>causing</em>&nbsp;students to do poorly in school, unexcused absences may be signals of significant challenges in students&rsquo; lives. To respond, the Madison Metropolitan School District (MMSD) is working to understand and act on those signals.</p> <p>Student absences in grades six through eight have steadily increased in MMSD since 2012. This trend, as well as a growing national focus on what some call an &lsquo;attendance crisis,&rsquo; led researchers from the&nbsp;<a href="http://mep.wceruw.org/" target="_blank">Madison Education Partnership</a>&nbsp;(MEP) and their school district collaborators to investigate the relationships between student absences, student demographic characteristics, and school climate, as well as how these patterns change as students progress through grades five to nine.</p> <p>&ldquo;MEP and MMSD wanted to learn more about how attendance impacts how kids learn and feel in their schools,&rdquo; says Andrew Statz, executive director of research, accountability and data use at MMSD and a MEP steering committee member. &ldquo;We know the national conversation, but wanted to dig deeper into our local story. We know from&nbsp;<a href="http://mep.wceruw.org/documents/Attendance-Research-Brief.pdf" target="_blank">previous reports</a>&nbsp;that attendance does not drive elementary student academic success in MMSD; we wondered, is the story the same in middle school?&rdquo;</p> <p>Over the past year, MEP has brought together MMSD staff and UW researchers to identify the questions that matter most around attendance, review the preliminary findings, and identify what these findings mean for action. What they discovered confirms several findings from an&nbsp;<a href="http://mep.wceruw.org/documents/Attendance-Research-Brief.pdf" target="_blank">earlier report of elementary school students</a>. According to the authors, simply improving attendance is unlikely to yield substantial improvements in academic achievement or reduce the achievement difference between advantaged and less advantaged students.</p> <p>The team wanted to know more, so they dug into additional questions about attendance. Based on an MMSD climate survey, the report states that students&nbsp;who have more positive perceptions of their school, specifically regarding feelings of safety and belonging, were more likely to be at school. The report also finds the median number of absences that each student receives has risen each year from 2012 to 2018. Not only do absences increase as students age, but they are increasingly on the rise during the period from middle to high school. &nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Lead researcher&nbsp;<a href="https://www.wcer.wisc.edu/About/Staff/5793" target="_blank">Katie Eklund</a>, a co-director of MEP, as well as a UW-Madison assistant professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://edpsych.education.wisc.edu/" title="Ed Psych home page" target="_blank">Department of Educational Psychology</a>, says this middle school transition is the time to intervene. &ldquo;These are the early predictors of worse attendance in high school &ndash; it is important for schools to pay attention to what might be leading to absences, especially during middle school.&rdquo;</p> <p>In partnership with MEP, the district&rsquo;s attendance team has spearheaded new work focused on attendance. These efforts include identifying and testing research-based, proactive attendance approaches, deepening understanding of why students miss school to help craft strategies, strengthening existing recording practices, and creating stronger systems to intervene on habitual truancy.</p> <p>&ldquo;The collaborative work with MEP to create, understand and act on this report has invigorated our team,&rdquo; states Megan Miller, the Lead Attendance Social Worker at MMSD and member of the MEP Attendance Research Design Team. &ldquo;We have brought together staff from all over the district to consider how we act on the signal attendance sends. Middle school students are sending us a message; we need to learn what that message means and respond supportively.&rdquo;</p> <p>The report concludes with recommendations for the district to further investigate the reasons students miss school and explore practices that may affect school climate.</p> <p>These initiatives, as well as detailed methodology, are elaborated in the&nbsp;<a href="http://mep.wceruw.org/documents/Middle-School-Attendance-Brief.pdf" target="_blank">full report here</a>.&nbsp;</p> <h3>About MEP</h3> <p>The Madison Education Partnership is a research-practice partnership between the UW&ndash;Madison School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://www.wcer.wisc.edu/" title="WCER website" target="_blank">Wisconsin Center for Education Research</a> and the Madison Metropolitan School District. Its collaborative mission is to engage in and support high-quality, problem-based research, contribute to policy discussions based on its research and share new knowledge to improve the experiences and individual outcomes for all district students.</p> <p>The partnership engages UW&ndash;Madison researchers and faculty; district administration, teachers and staff; as well as stakeholders from the broader Madison community to support the development and use of high-quality, relevant, and timely research.</p>urn:uuid:0bb4c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/10/11/green-bay-press-times-reports-on-future-of-public-education-presentation-from-uw-madison-s-mead Green Bay Press Times reports on future of public education presentation from UW-Madison’s Mead The Press Times reported on a presentation delivered by UW-Madison’s Julie Mead. Mead is the School of Education’s associate dean for education, and is a professor with the School’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. On Sept. 24 the League pf Women Voters of Greater Green Bay, in connection with the Patricia Marguerite O’Neil Memorial Fund, hosted Mead for a discussion on the future of public education. Fri, 11 Oct 2019 10:38:00 Z<p>The Press Times reported on a presentation delivered by UW-Madison&rsquo;s Julie Mead.&nbsp;</p> <p>Mead is the School of Education&rsquo;s associate dean for education, and is a professor with the School&rsquo;s <a href="https://elpa.education.wisc.edu/" title="ELPA home page" target="_blank">Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p>On Sept. 24 the League pf Women Voters of Greater Green Bay, in connection with the Patricia Marguerite O&rsquo;Neil Memorial Fund, hosted Mead for a discussion on the future of public education.&nbsp;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/julie-meada6b4c237c0a569e0ad6dff0000cdac6d.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Julie Mead" displaymode="Original" title="Julie Mead" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Mead </figcaption> </figure> </div> During the presentation, Mead discussed the history of how public education got to where it is today. She explained that not only the state of Wisconsin, but all 50 states, have determined that public education is not just a discretionary act that legislators can "do." but a primary purpose of state government.&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;Whether we are talking about someone at the school board level, whether we are talking about those we elect to represent us in the state assembly, whether we are talking about our state-elected superintendent of public instruction, whether we are talking about our governor, our United States Senators, representatives we send to Congress, or the president &mdash; all of those people have a role, as do we, in policy formation around education,&rdquo; she said, according to the Press Times.</p> <p>The newspaper reports Mead stressed that continued discussion is necessary by educators and policymakers alike to keep looking for new and innovative ways to improve public education. She suggests that education is a situation where satisfaction is never attainable and it never should be.</p> <p>&ldquo;Collectively, through those that represent us, we redefine from time to time what it means to be educated&nbsp;and what needs to be a part of a fully-educated person,&rdquo; Mead explained. &ldquo;We also decide on the standards of that education.&rdquo;</p> <p>According the Press Times, Mead defines the standards of public education as public purpose, public funding, public access, public accountability of communities, and public curriculum. She urges the public, educators, and policymakers to continue debating ideas about changing the system moving forward.</p> <p>&ldquo;We have a lot of work to do to make these places the kind of our places that our kids deserve to be, but overall, we still have this very special thing called public education,&rdquo; Mead said, according to the report.</p> Read the complete Press Times report <a href="https://gopresstimes.com/2019/09/30/professor-mead-discusses-future-of-public-education/" title="Press Times article" target="_blank">here</a>.urn:uuid:23b4c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/10/11/uw-madison-s-smith-offers-10-ways-to-enjoy-art-for-the-amateur-gallery-goer UW-Madison’s Smith offers 10 ways to enjoy art for the amateur gallery-goerUW–Madison’s Leslie Smith III is a contemporary abstract artist and associate professor with the School of Education’s Art Department. His work, which is primarily oil paint on shaped canvasses, is displayed both nationally and internationally, and is currently on display at the Galerie Isabelle Gounod in Paris. “I think if you’ve never had the opportunity to view art and be critical of it,” Smith says, “it’s an experience worth having because I think when you’ve had that experience, it’s a lot easier to maybe understand some other seemingly unrelated issue or concern that you might have with the world, or with yourself."Fri, 11 Oct 2019 10:33:00 Z<p>UW&ndash;Madison&rsquo;s Leslie Smith III is a contemporary abstract artist and associate professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="http://art.wisc.edu" title="Art Dept. website" target="_blank">Art Department</a>.</p> <p><a href="http://www.lesliesmith3.com/">His work</a>, which is primarily oil paint on shaped canvasses, is displayed both nationally and internationally, and is currently on display at the Galerie Isabelle Gounod in Paris.</p> <p>&ldquo;I think if you&rsquo;ve never had the opportunity to view art and be critical of it,&rdquo; Smith says, &ldquo;it&rsquo;s an experience worth having because I think when you&rsquo;ve had that experience, it&rsquo;s a lot easier to maybe understand some other seemingly unrelated issue or concern that you might have with the world, or with yourself. You identify something, an object, an image, that brings you intrigue or some type of visual pleasure, and then you try to better understand it, and in doing so, you find out more about yourself.&rdquo;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/lesliesmithiii-1-282x300-1.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Leslie Smith III" displaymode="Original" title="LeslieSmithIII-1-282x300-1" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Leslie Smith III </figcaption> </figure> </div> He adds, &ldquo;The reason why it&rsquo;s important to view and see art is to better understand not only the world that you live in and that you traverse, but just be aware of how other people are seeing the same things and experiencing the same things that you are, but are finding other ways of expressing it.&rdquo;</p> <p>Here, Smith offers a guide to engaging with art for everyone &mdash; regardless of experience or interest:</p> <ol> <li><strong>Arrive without expectations.&nbsp;</strong>&ldquo;I find that people, when they go to museums or galleries, they have an expectation on how they&rsquo;re going to be perceived, how to act, how to dress. Just be yourself. I feel like if you can get over the hurdle of entering into a new space, a space that&rsquo;s not typical of your everyday space of work, the grocery, the gas station, whatever, and you go in with pure curiosity, you&rsquo;ll be fine.&rdquo;</li> <li><strong>Don&rsquo;t be afraid to form your own opinions.&nbsp;</strong>&ldquo;Not everything is art, and not everything is good. Just because someone else really loves it or writes that it&rsquo;s really great, doesn&rsquo;t mean that you have to feel that way, too. After [art] leaves a studio, it&rsquo;s really up to you as the viewer to take it and do with it what you want. But give it time.&rdquo;</li> <li><strong>Know that not all artwork has to mean something.&nbsp;</strong>&ldquo;Not all artwork has to be something that you can quantify as an idea to &lsquo;get.&rsquo; Sometimes work, especially contemporary work, is to create, in that experience [and] in that moment, a challenging inquiry. The work isn&rsquo;t directly about an event, a moment in time, or a place or a person; it&rsquo;s about an experience that that artist wants to share with you, so part of understanding that work is to allow yourself to experience it. There might be a series of events in that sculpture or that installation that makes you feel a certain way. That could be very well intentional. Allow yourself to be open to the experience of questioning why things are the way they are.&rdquo;</li> <li><strong>Find out what you like and take notes.&nbsp;</strong>&ldquo;If you like the work, jot down the name of the artist. Maybe ask the gallery for some information on the artist and start to just keep a little running archive of the things that you like. You might find that there&rsquo;s a thread that connects the work that you respond to right now. That&rsquo;s going to change over time. But it gives you the opportunity to bookmark things so that when they pop up again, you can go see, &lsquo;Well, what is that artist doing? Has that work changed?&rsquo;&rdquo;</li> <li><strong>Be informed before you go.&nbsp;</strong>&ldquo;You can&rsquo;t make your decisions purely based on what you see, because things function very different in person than they do over your phone or the computer screen. Try to figure out, &lsquo;Well, who are these artists? Do they have a narrative?&rsquo; Read their statements, go to their websites. Do some reading. Figure out, &lsquo;Are the concerns that this artist is making work about, is that interesting to me? Do I like something about the material that they&rsquo;re using? Do I have questions?&rsquo; I tend to always suggest [to] go to galleries, see exhibitions that make you ask yourself, &lsquo;What is that? What? I&rsquo;ve never seen that before.&rsquo; So go see it.&rdquo;</li> <li><strong>Think about how the art is made.&nbsp;</strong>&ldquo;I think a lot of understanding art is understanding the materials [and] what the artist has done to manipulate the materials. I think there are deep mysteries oftentimes in how art exists, and then that&rsquo;s purposeful because I think it allows you a way into the way the artist thinks. If you&rsquo;re interested in the work that the artist has done before and is doing now, then I think it&rsquo;s worth, not trying to reverse engineer the work, but to try to understand the complexities, the lengths [to] which the artist is going to communicate this idea to you.&rdquo;</li> <li><strong>Read, but don&rsquo;t live by, text and titles.&nbsp;</strong>&ldquo;Gallery text and museum text is important. It definitely has a place. The show essays and things like that, they help create a context for the exhibition. But they aren&rsquo;t the end-all be-all, and I think a lot of folks get lost in that stuff. I can&rsquo;t tell you how many times I go to exhibitions and I just do not read the text because it&rsquo;s just like, &lsquo;I don&rsquo;t care.&rsquo; I care, but I want to come up with my own opinion. [But] I think titles are important. I know I bashed texts with a big T, but titles, they come from the artists. They&rsquo;re a way of offering a parameter to understanding the limitations of the work, or to understanding where the work wants to be considered. So, I say, read titles.&rdquo;</li> <li><strong>Be curious about curation.</strong>&ldquo;There&rsquo;s an art form to curating that I don&rsquo;t think a lot of people think about. One thing that I like to encourage my graduate students to do is to go into institutional museums to look at the individual works and the shows, but when you do that, also spend time thinking about how the curator [is] being an artist here. How are they expanding upon the conversations that each individual artist is having and [trying] to draw your attention to what they might mean when brought together because oftentimes that&rsquo;s connected to some other type of cultural or social situation? There&rsquo;s a theme, or a variation of that theme, that&rsquo;s happening out in the real world, and they&rsquo;re finding a way to connect those dots through art that&rsquo;s being made right now.&rdquo;</li> <li><strong>Make a practice of consuming art.&nbsp;</strong>&ldquo;It becomes just a fixture of your life. It&rsquo;s not like an occasion of, &lsquo;Oh, we&rsquo;re going to go to Disneyland.&rsquo; It&rsquo;s not a vacation. It just seeps in and becomes something that you do. Just like you go grocery shopping. I think if you can get to that place, then you&rsquo;ve opened yourself up to just enjoying art and enjoying what artists do.&rdquo;</li> <li><strong>Support your local artists.&nbsp;</strong>&ldquo;Not all art is in galleries and museums. Look into nonprofit galleries and art spaces, because they are the ones taking risks and giving artists their first breaks. It&rsquo;s some of the best art and art that speaks to right now, without the commercial incentive. Start with local artists. Figure out that community, because it&rsquo;s empowering for both the artists and the audience.&rdquo;</li> </ol>urn:uuid:1bb4c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/10/10/uw-madison-s-miller-writes-at-medium-com-about-experience-in-the-education-system UW-Madison’s Miller writes at Medium.com about experience in education systemUW-Madison’s Keith Miller Jr. recently published an article at Medium.com headlined “Confessions of an ‘At-Risk’ Black Boy Turned Educator.” Miller explains that it’s “a nine-minute read/journey to the center of my own trauma and experience as a Black body in the education system and the journey to leading the work in my community at the Deep Center, and the transformative process it sparked.”Thu, 10 Oct 2019 10:23:00 Z<p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s Keith Miller Jr. recently published an article at Medium.com headlined &ldquo;Confessions of an &lsquo;At-Risk&rsquo; Black Boy Turned Educator.&rdquo;</p> <p>Miller explains that it&rsquo;s&nbsp;&ldquo;a nine-minute read/journey to the center of my own trauma and experience as a Black body in the education system and the journey to leading the work in my community at the Deep Center, and the transformative process it sparked.&rdquo;</p> <p><img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/keith-f-miller-jr.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Keith Miller" title="Keith F. Miller Jr" class="FloatImageRight" />Miller is in the midst of completing his coursework with the <a href="https://mspe.education.wisc.edu/" title="MSPE website" target="_blank">master of science for professional educators (MSPE) program</a> from the School of Education. The MSPE program is a fully online education program offended through the <a href="https://edpsych.education.wisc.edu/" title="Ed Psych website" target="_blank">Department of Educational Psychology</a> that also integrates courses from the <a href="https://ci.education.wisc.edu/" title="C&amp;I website" target="_blank">Department of Curriculum and Instruction</a>, and <a href="https://elpa.education.wisc.edu/" title="ELPA website" target="_blank">Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis</a> &ndash; leading to a Master of Science in Educational Psychology degree.</p> <p>He details his personal experience in the education system, talking about his struggles with learning. Miller remembers that his teachers discussed putting him in special education classes, but his mother resisted. &ldquo;Whether she knew it or not, my low grades and test scores weren&rsquo;t proof of a learning disability,&rdquo; he says. &ldquo;They were evidence of something else: the trauma of a young boy buckling under the weight of poverty and a crippling fear of failure.&rdquo; He describes how every lesson, with a few exceptions, felt like another opportunity to fall short of the bar placed before him. &nbsp;</p> <p>Miller continues, recalling that he didn&rsquo;t understand the point behind learning, because only playing could relieve the pain of the constant feeling of hopelessness and helplessness that invaded all aspects of his youth. While the symptoms of complex trauma were persistent, he notes that no educator or counselor seemed to pick up on it.&nbsp;</p> <p>Eventually, Miller writes, through the patience and tireless dedication of his mother and future stepfather, he discovered he was enough and his voice was too. He began to see learning, reading, and writing as tools to help him find his power and reimagine the world around him, rather than shackles that held him down.</p> <p>According to Miller, being an educator was never a part of his plan. After attending college 1,000 miles away from his hometown, he moved to live and work in New York City. Miller worked training adult mentors at a youth mentoring organization, as an administrator at a major university, and as a storyteller and creative for an education reform organization. &nbsp;</p> <p>However, after relocating to his hometown, Miller stumbled across a job at a small literacy nonprofit. Though he was hesitant, he came to realize that everything that he had gone through equipped him to be the true definition of an educator, &ldquo;a master weaver who can take the painful webs of rejection, trauma, shame, and then use it to heal ourselves and others.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p>Read Miller&rsquo;s complete story <a href="https://medium.com/@keith_85090/confessions-of-an-at-risk-black-boy-turned-educator-5cd3d19f7089" title="Miller's article" target="_blank">via this Medium.com web page</a>.&nbsp;</p>urn:uuid:a7b0c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/10/09/alum-hofacker-named-director-of-uw-madison-s-posse-scholarship-program Alum Hofacker named director of UW-Madison’s Posse scholarship programEmilie Hofacker, a School of Education alumna, will continue to impact students as the newly named director of the university’s Posse program. The initiative identifies and awards full-tuition scholarships to public high school students with extraordinary potential who may be overlooked in the traditional college selection process. UW–Madison is one of 58 partner colleges and universities that takes part in the national program.Wed, 09 Oct 2019 09:36:00 Z<p>Many of the items on her shelves and walls were presented to her by students, including almost two dozen awards thanking her for the role she played in their college success.</p> <p>Emilie&nbsp;Hofacker, a UW&ndash;Madison School of Education alumna, will continue to impact students as the newly named director of&nbsp;<a href="https://posseprogram.wisc.edu/">the university&rsquo;s Posse program</a>. The initiative identifies and awards full-tuition scholarships to public high school students with extraordinary potential who may be overlooked in the traditional college selection process. UW&ndash;Madison is one of 58 partner colleges and universities that takes part in the national program.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/emiliehofacker1-375x500.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Hofacker" displaymode="Original" title="EmilieHofacker1-375x500" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Hofacker </figcaption> </figure> </div> Hofacker was named to the UW&ndash;Madison position July 15 after serving as the program&rsquo;s interim director for the past two years.</p> <p>&ldquo;Emilie&nbsp;brings a wealth of experience to the position, including having worked with underrepresented students at UW&ndash;Madison for 13-plus years, eight of which have been with the UW Posse program,&rdquo; says Sherri Ann Charleston, an assistant vice provost in the&nbsp;<a href="https://diversity.wisc.edu/about/about-ddeea/">Division of Diversity, Equity and Educational Achievement</a>. &ldquo;She is an outstanding leader and skillful collaborator with a passion and commitment for Posse that excites those who have the good fortune to work with her.&rdquo;</p> <p>Hofacker&rsquo;s strong connection to UW&ndash;Madison began when she attended a seven-week-long summer science institute on campus her sophomore and junior years as a high school student from Kimberly, Wisconsin. She&rsquo;s been in the UW&ndash;Madison sphere ever since.</p> <p>As a UW&ndash;Madison undergraduate, she immersed herself in science and research, earning a bachelor&rsquo;s degree in 2004 as a double major in biology and communication science (rhetorical studies). She earned a master&rsquo;s degree from UW&ndash;Madison in 2006 from the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://elpa.education.wisc.edu/" title="ELPA website" target="_blank">Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis</a>.</p> <p>Hofacker then worked on campus for several years as a program coordinator for the <a href="https://peopleprogram.wisc.edu/" title="PEOPLE program" target="_blank">Precollege Enrichment Opportunity Program for Learning Excellence (PEOPLE)</a>. While earning her second master&rsquo;s degree from UW&ndash;Madison, she began her association with Posse.</p> <p>Nationally, Posse recruits, selects, and trains public high school students from 10 major U.S. cities, then sends them to college in multicultural teams of 10 called &ldquo;posses.&rdquo; UW&ndash;Madison joined the program in 2002 and recruits from four of those 10 cities (Chicago, Los Angeles, Washington, and New York).</p> <p>Each fall, UW&ndash;Madison welcomes 40 new Posse scholars (four posses of 10 each). Each posse is assigned a mentor who stays with the group for its first two years. UW&ndash;Madison uses graduate students as mentors. That&rsquo;s how Hofacker connected with the program &mdash; she served as the mentor for the first posse from New York when the city was added to UW&ndash;Madison&rsquo;s lineup in 2011.</p> <p>The New York posse also was the first at UW&ndash;Madison to be focused entirely on students planning to major in science, technology, engineering, or mathematics &mdash; the STEM fields. (Scholars from Chicago, Los Angeles and Washington are not focused on any one discipline.)</p> <p>Since then, Hofacker has served in multiple capacities related to Posse at UW&ndash;Madison. She mentored a second posse of New York STEM students, served as the assistant director for Posse STEM initiatives, and became the founding director of the Office of STEM Initiatives within the Division of Diversity, Equity and Educational Achievement.</p> <p>In 2017, she was asked to serve as the interim director for UW&ndash;Madison&rsquo;s Posse program. She eagerly accepted.</p> <p>&ldquo;We have such a robust program here with phenomenal scholars who are amazing young people and leaders,&rdquo; Hofacker says. &ldquo;They bring a beautiful and diverse presence to this campus. We try to ensure that they have a wonderful experience here and are able to fully tap all the resources the university has to offer.&rdquo;</p> <p>Hofacker brings to the job years of research specifically related to Posse, underrepresented student populations, and STEM fields. Her second master&rsquo;s degree in 2013 in curriculum and instruction focused on these areas, and she&rsquo;s continuing the research as she pursues a PhD, also on campus.</p> <p>As Hofacker begins her tenure, UW&ndash;Madison&rsquo;s Posse program can claim several bragging rights. The university is the largest Posse school nationwide and the only one with a Posse director, a Posse office, and a dedicated Posse advisor. It also is one of the few institutions that taps graduate students to be mentors.</p> <p>&ldquo;A lot of what we do here is starting to be incorporated into the national model because they&rsquo;re seeing the benefits of the approach,&rdquo; Hofacker says.</p> <p>Her goals as director include boosting connections with UW&ndash;Madison Posse alumni, creating a Posse advisory board, and strengthening the program&rsquo;s fundraising efforts. She&rsquo;d love for the program to be able to award mini-travel grants for professional development opportunities such as conferences and leadership workshops.</p> <p>Students who travel tend to keep Hofacker in their thoughts. Years ago, Posse students began bringing back refrigerator magnets for her from all over the globe. Dozens now adorn her office. Other students have created artwork for her. One student gave her a giant wall hanging of the periodic table, a nod to her STEM work.</p> <p>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s such a remarkable community,&rdquo; Hofacker says of the Posse program. &ldquo;There&rsquo;s a thing we call &lsquo;Posse love.&rsquo; Once you&rsquo;re a part of it, it will always be a part of you.&rdquo;</p>urn:uuid:13b4c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/10/09/flow--the-art-of-felipe-and-carlos-eduardo-gacharn---on-display-at-academic-staff-art-gallery 'Flow: The Art of Felipe and Carlos Eduardo Gacharná' on display at Academic Staff Art GalleryThe work of the School of Education’s Felipe Gacharná and his brother, Carlos Eduardo Gacharná, is being showcased in the Academic Staff Art Gallery in Bascom Hall. Their photography series is titled, “Flow: The Art of Felipe and Carlos Eduardo Gacharná.” An opening reception is scheduled for Monday, Oct. 14, from 2:45 to 3:30 p.m. The Academic Staff Art Gallery is housed in room 270 of Bascom Hall.Wed, 09 Oct 2019 09:21:00 Z<p>The work of the School of Education&rsquo;s Felipe Gacharn&aacute; and his brother, Carlos Eduardo Gacharn&aacute;, is being showcased in the Academic Staff Art Gallery in Bascom Hall.&nbsp;</p> <p>Their photography series is titled, &ldquo;Flow: The Art of Felipe and Carlos Eduardo Gacharn&aacute;.&rdquo; An opening reception is scheduled for Monday, Oct. 14, from 2:45 to 3:30 p.m. The Academic Staff Art Gallery is housed in room 270 of Bascom Hall. The exhibit runs until January 2020.</p> <p>The Office of the Secretary of the Academic Staff launched The Academic Staff Art Gallery in the 2010 to showcase talented artists from within the academic staff. Exhibits change on a semester by semester basis.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/flow-300x200.png?sfvrsn=0" alt="Image fro Flow" displaymode="Original" title="Flow-300x200" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">An image from "Flow: The Art of Felipe and Carlos<br /> Eduardo&nbsp;Gacharn&aacute;," is on display in the Academic<br /> Staff Art Gallery, room 270 of Bascom Hall.</figcaption> </figure> </div> Felipe is a web developer with the School of Education&rsquo;s Office of Communications and Advancement, while his brother, Carlos, is an alumnus of the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="http://art.wisc.edu" target="_blank">Art Department</a>, who today is an artist and educator living in Long Beach, California.&nbsp;</p> <p>Describing the exhibit, Felipe explains that artists and scientists now share similar positions on the edge of human understanding.&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;While scientists aim to enlighten by deciphering quantitative data, artists delve into the ephemera of the human conscience in the hopes of inspiring others,&rdquo; says Felipe. &ldquo;But what if enlightenment and inspiration share more than it appears?&rdquo;</p> <p>The Gacharn&aacute; brothers, who were born in Colombia and are both UW-Madison alumni, explore this very question through their photography. They use high-powered black lights and special fluorescent dyes in an effort to capture the material nature of energy itself.&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;That eternal, ever-changing force that controls and composes the universe might have something to teach us about the fundamental human experience,&rdquo; says Felipe. &ldquo;What if society learned to embrace change and transformation, even in times of loss? 'Flow' poses the hypothesis that if we accept the transient nature of life, like energy itself, we might be better able to appreciate the beauty of a single moment. We hope you enjoy these works as opportunities for quiet reflection &ndash;- on the universe, and yourselves.&rdquo;</p>urn:uuid:bcb3c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/10/07/2019-msan-student-conference-oct--23-26 2019 MSAN Student Conference Oct. 23-26More than 200 high school students and their chaperones from 19 U.S. school districts will be at the Madison Concourse Hotel Oct. 23-26 for the Minority Student Achievement Network Student Conference, an annual event aimed at developing student leaders dedicated to ending racial disparities in achievement and opportunity. Launched in 1999, MSAN is a project of the Wisconsin Center for Education Research, a part UW-Madison’s School of Education. Mon, 07 Oct 2019 22:16:09 Z<p>More than 200 high school students and their chaperones from 19 U.S. school districts will be at the Madison Concourse Hotel Oct. 23-26 for the <a href="http://msan.wceruw.org/conferences/studentConf.html">Minority Student Achievement Network Student Conference</a>, an annual event aimed at developing student leaders dedicated to ending racial disparities in achievement and opportunity. </p> <p>Sponsored this year by the Middleton-Cross Plains Area School District, where students helped plan conference events, the gathering will feature guided tours of schools and colleges at UW-Madison on the morning of Oct. 24. Students also will take part in a full day of action planning on Oct. 25, when they brainstorm and develop projects designed to address disparities back home at their own schools.</p> <p><img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/msan-anniversary.png?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="MSAN 20th anniversary logo" title="MSAN-Anniversary" class="FloatImageRight" />Other highlights include an opening keynote address from Wisconsin Lt. Gov. Mandela Barnes. Barnes, a Milwaukee native, became the first African-American to serve as lieutenant governor when he was elected in November 2018, and the second African-American ever to hold statewide office in Wisconsin.</p> <p>Other keynote speakers will be Jos&eacute; Gonz&aacute;lez, a teacher in the Tucson district and Xicanx Institute for Teaching and Organizing, on Oct. 24, and Bettina Love, an award-winning author and associate professor of educational theory and practice from the University of Georgia, on Oct. 25. Love is regarded as one of the field&rsquo;s most esteemed educational researchers in the areas of how anti-blackness operates in schools, hip-hop education and urban education. Her work also covers how teachers and schools working with parents and communities can build communal, civically engaged schools rooted in intersectional social justice toward the goal of equitable classrooms.</p> <p>Gonz&aacute;lez is in his 28th year of teaching, with a current focus on culturally relevant American history: Mexican American perspective and a social justice perspectives class at Tucson High Magnet School. His teaching, in part, seeks to foster and facilitate within his students a strong sense of identity and student voice, while infusing a self-discipline approach to life.</p> <p>This year&rsquo;s conference also marks the 20th anniversary of <a href="http://msan.wceruw.org/">MSAN,</a> which is headquartered at UW-Madison and organized as a national coalition of 28 multiracial school districts focused on understanding and eliminating gaps in opportunity and achievement that persist within their own schools.</p> Launched in 1999, MSAN is a project of the <a href="https://wcer.wisc.edu/">Wisconsin Center for Education Research</a>, a part of UW-Madison's School of Education. In addition to engaging in collaborative research, it organizes two conferences annually: the student conference in the fall and an MSAN Institute for educators each spring.urn:uuid:7cb1c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/10/07/madison365-spotlights-jordan-s-mural-depicting-african-american-history-in-madison Madison365 spotlights Jordan's mural depicting African-American history in MadisonMadison365.com puts the spotlight on Jerry Jordan’s mural at Madison College’s new Goodman South Campus in a recent article. Jordan, a recruitment and retention specialist with the School of Education’s Student Diversity Programs Office, was commissioned by the college to paint a mural depicting African-American history in Madison, specifically South Madison, where the new facilities were built. Mon, 07 Oct 2019 11:33:00 Z<p>Madison365.com puts the spotlight on Jerry Jordan&rsquo;s mural at Madison College&rsquo;s new Goodman South Campus in a recent article.&nbsp;</p> <p>Jordan, a recruitment and retention specialist with the School of Education&rsquo;s Student Diversity Programs Office, was commissioned by the college to paint a mural depicting African-American history in Madison, specifically South Madison, where the new facilities were built.&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/madison365report.png?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Madison365.com report" title="Madison365report " class="FloatImageRight" />The Madison365.com article is headlined, "This Mural has Black Madison Buzzing."<br /> <br /> Jordan's 10-foot by five-foot mural depicts 37 people, all black, each with their own story, each pivotal to the history of Black Madison, according to Madison365.com.<br /> <br /> Behind the portraits stands the state capitol&rsquo;s recognizable dome, and below are other significant markers of the history of black Madison, like the Allison House, the boarding house where black people new to town stayed when they couldn&rsquo;t find housing.</p> <p>Each of the 37 people depicted have strong connections to Madison. They range from national figures &mdash; who had an impact even though they just passed through &mdash;such as Dr. Martin Luther King, to names that are still seen around town, like Velma Hamilton and even more contemporary figures, like Madison365&rsquo;s own CEO and publisher, Henry Sanders.&nbsp;</p> <p>Jordan made a conscious decision to depict many historical figures as their younger selves, explaining &ldquo;They were young people at one point and very few people have ever seen them as young. Why not show them as a younger person? This is a woman standing here, full of hopes and dreams, and a big, bright future ahead of her.&rdquo;</p> <p>Jordan, who wanted to be an artist since he was a child, has also taught for MATC in the past. From 1997 to 2001, he taught drawing at its main Truax Campus. Now, Jordan&rsquo;s art can be seen not only at the Goodman South Campus, but around the Midwest as he exhibits his work in various galleries.&nbsp;</p> Read more about Jordan and his mural <a href="https://madison365.com/this-mural-has-black-madison-buzzing/" title="Madison365 article" target="_blank">via this Madison365.com web page</a>.&nbsp;urn:uuid:9fb0c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/10/07/uw-madison-s-baldridge-to-discuss--reclaiming-community--at-wisconsin-book-festival UW-Madison’s Baldridge to discuss 'Reclaiming Community' at Wisconsin Book FestivalUW-Madison’s Bianca Baldridge will be giving a book talk on her new work, “Reclaiming Community: Race and the Uncertain Future of Youth Work”, at the Wisconsin Book Festival on Oct. 18. Her presentation begins at 4:30 p.m. in Community Room 301 at Madison's Central Library. Baldridge, a sociologist of education and an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Policy Studies, is a life-long youth worker and community-engaged scholar.Mon, 07 Oct 2019 10:34:00 Z<p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s Bianca Baldridge will be giving a book talk on her new work, &ldquo;Reclaiming Community: Race and the Uncertain Future of Youth Work&rdquo;, at the Wisconsin Book Festival on Oct. 18.<br /> <br /> Her presentation begins at 4:30 p.m. in Community Room 301 at Madison's Central Library.<br /> <br /> Baldridge, a sociologist of education and an assistant professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://eps.education.wisc.edu/" title="EPS home page" target="_blank">Department of Educational Policy Studies</a>, is a life-long youth worker and community-engaged scholar. She is a highly sought-after speaker and facilitator given her expertise guiding community-based leaders and youth workers through professional development opportunities to disrupt whiteness and deficit-based narratives within youth-serving organizations.&nbsp;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/bianca-baldridge-new-book.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Bianca Baldridge with Reclaiming Community" displaymode="Original" title="Bianca Baldridge new book" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption"> Bianca Baldridge will talk about her new book,<br /> "Reclaiming Community," on Oct. 18.</figcaption> </figure> </div> Working with a number of community-based organizations and city agencies across the country, Baldridge has spent almost two decades engaged in community-based youth work as a curriculum developer and educator working alongside minoritized youth towards educational freedom and justice.&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;Reclaiming Community&rdquo; tells the story of a community-based program, Educational Excellence (EE), shining a light on the invaluable role youth workers play in such spaces, and the precarious context in which these programs now exist.&nbsp;</p> <p>Approximately 2.4 million Black youth participate in after-school programs, which offer a range of support, including academic tutoring, college preparation, political identity development, cultural and emotional support, and even a space to develop strategies and tools for organizing and activism.&nbsp;</p> <p>Drawing on rich ethnographic data, Baldridge contends that the story of EE is representative of a much larger and understudied phenomenon. With the spread of neoliberal ideology and its reliance on racism, these spaces of community support are losing the autonomy that has allowed them to embolden the minds of the youth they serve.</p>urn:uuid:2bb2c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/10/04/uw-madison-s-charleston-to-speak-on-panel-at-wisconsin-leadership-conference-oct--7 UW-Madison’s Charleston to speak on panel at Wisconsin Leadership Conference Oct. 7UW–Madison’s LaVar Charleston will be taking part in a panel discussion on Monday, Oct. 7, that’s part of the second annual Wisconsin Leadership Conference at the Overture Center for the Arts in Madison. Charleston is the School of Education’s associate dean for diversity and inclusion. The panel event he is taking part in will be moderated by Joan Prince and is titled, “Beyond Forward, Part 2: Have Four-Year Colleges and Universities Prepared the Next Generation for the Workforce Our State Needs?”Fri, 04 Oct 2019 09:47:00 Z<p>UW&ndash;Madison&rsquo;s LaVar Charleston will be taking part in a panel discussion on Monday, Oct. 7, that&rsquo;s part of the second annual Wisconsin Leadership Conference at the Overture Center for the Arts in Madison.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/lavar-charleston-250-px-sq-2019.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="LaVar Charleston" displaymode="Original" title="LaVar Charleston 250 px SQ 2019" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Charleston </figcaption> </figure> </div> Charleston is the School of Education&rsquo;s associate dean for diversity and inclusion. The panel event he is taking part in will be moderated by Joan Prince and is titled, &ldquo;Beyond Forward, Part 2: Have Four-Year Colleges and Universities Prepared the Next Generation for the Workforce Our State Needs?&rdquo; </p> <p>This session begins at 11 a.m. and is being held in the MMoCA Lecture Hall.&nbsp;</p> <p>A preview of the breakout session, which also includes panelists Antoiwana Williamsn, Selika Duckworth-Lawton, and Claudia Guzman, asks: &ldquo;Are our colleges and universities giving our young people of color the tools they need to really thrive in the workforce of the future? Are we creating a talent pool that can support a thriving, inclusive economy? What are our higher education institutions doing to create a more inclusive and equitable economy ten years from now?&rdquo;</p> <p>More than 110 leaders in a range of sectors from across the state are taking part in this year&rsquo;s Wisconsin Leadership Summit, which runs Oct. 7-8.&nbsp; For details <a href="https://www.wileadershipsummit.com" title="Learn more here" target="_blank">visit the event web page</a>.</p>urn:uuid:8dafc237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/10/04/tolerance-magazine-highlights-research-on-diversity-in-children-s-books-from-uw-madison-s-ccbc Tolerance magazine highlights research on diversity in children's books from UW-Madison’s CCBCA recent report from Tolerance magazine utilizes research from UW-Madison’s Cooperative Children’s Book Center (CCBC). The article shares the experiences of elementary students and teachers at Tapestry Charter School in Buffalo, NY, as part of the school’s project “I am the author of my own story.”Fri, 04 Oct 2019 09:25:00 Z<p>A recent report from Tolerance magazine utilizes research from UW-Madison&rsquo;s <a href="https://ccbc.education.wisc.edu/" title="CCBC website" target="_blank">Cooperative Children&rsquo;s Book Center (CCBC)</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p>The magazine report shares the experiences of elementary students and teachers at Tapestry Charter School in Buffalo, New York, as part of the school&rsquo;s project &ldquo;I am the author of my own story.&rdquo;</p> <p>Reading specialist Kaylan Lelito noticed that students of different backgrounds didn&rsquo;t find most of the books they read in class interesting or impactful. Working with Tapestry librarian Jennifer Chapman, they developed this project to address the lack of diversity in children&rsquo;s books.&nbsp;</p> <p>The project included having children write their own stories, as well as writing persuasive letters to major children&rsquo;s book publishers, articulating their need for characters and stories that better reflected diverse experiences. One student wrote, &ldquo;I&rsquo;m Muslim, and I don&rsquo;t get a chance to read about people like me. Other people should get a chance to read about different people, too. To me, learning something new about others makes me feel like I can connect with them and understand them.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/horning_kt_20169f50c037c0a569e0ad6dff0000cdac6d5f6fc037c0a569e0ad6dff0000cdac6d.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="horning_kt_20169f50c037c0a569e0ad6dff0000cdac6d" displaymode="Original" title="horning_kt_20169f50c037c0a569e0ad6dff0000cdac6d" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Horning </figcaption> </figure> </div> Though this article focuses on Tapestry Charter School, the CCBC&rsquo;s research reveals that diversity in children&rsquo;s books is a widespread issue. According to a 2018 study conducted by the CCBC, more than 50 percent of students in the U.S. are children of color, while only 13 percent of children&rsquo;s books from the last 20 years contain multicultural characters, storylines, and/or settings.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> These numbers only measure the presence or absence of representation &mdash; they don't evaluate the quality of books the feature characters with underrepresented identities. "Just because you have 300 books about African Americans," CCBC Director KT Horning says, "doesn't mean all 300 of those are books you would recommend."<br /> <br /> Horning also shared strategies for honoring a diversity of student experiences in children's books with Tolerance magazine. She suggests considering quality before quantity, purchasing second copies of popular books featuring underrepresented characters before searching for a new title.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> "Just because a book has been on your shelf for 10 years doesn't mean you have to keep it there," Horning explains. "You should really go by quality as much as possible."<br /> <br /> Horning also recommends that teachers work closely with their school librarians, as they often have book budgets while teachers don't. She suggests that teachers ask their librarians to purchase multiple copies of a particular book or to help with diversifying the collection.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> Read the complete Tolerance magazine article <a href="https://www.tolerance.org/magazine/fall-2019/authors-of-their-own-stories" title="Tolerance magazine article" target="_blank">here</a>.<br /> <br /> The CCBC is housed within UW-Madison&rsquo;s School of Education. It publishes an annual report tracking the number of children&rsquo;s books by and about people of color and from First/Native Nations. The center start tracking these numbers in 1985, documenting them in their annual best books listing, &ldquo;CCBC Choices&rdquo; publication. Today, the CCBC also maintains a&nbsp;<a href="https://ccbc.education.wisc.edu/books/pcstats.asp" title="Visit the CCBC website to learn more" target="_blank">web page</a>&nbsp;devoted to multicultural literature, including lists of recommended titles by age group.&nbsp;</p>urn:uuid:8fb0c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/10/03/flight--torn-like-a-rose---runs-oct--31-to-nov--2-at-h-doubler-performance-space ‘Flight: Torn like a rose,’ runs Oct. 31 to Nov. 2 at H’Doubler Performance SpaceThe School of Education’s Dance Department, along with Peggy Choy Dance company and UW-Madison’s Asian American Studies program, presents “Flight: Torn like a rose,” which will be held at the H’Doubler Performance Space in Lathrop Hall from Oct. 31 to Nov. 2. Peggy Choy, an associate professor with the Dance Department, has a foundation in Korean and Javanese dance, Asian martial arts, and is a certified teacher of Dayan Qigong — a 1,700 year-old vital energy force practice from China. Thu, 03 Oct 2019 10:27:00 Z<p>The School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="http://dance.wisc.edu" title="Dance Dept. website" target="_blank">Dance Department</a>, along with Peggy Choy Dance company and UW-Madison&rsquo;s <a href="https://asianamerican.wisc.edu/" title="Asian American Studies website" target="_blank">Asian American Studies</a> program, presents &ldquo;Flight: Torn like a rose,&rdquo; which will be held at the H&rsquo;Doubler Performance Space in Lathrop Hall from Oct. 31 to Nov. 2. &nbsp;</p> <p>Peggy Choy, an associate professor with the Dance Department, has a foundation in Korean and Javanese dance, Asian martial arts, and is a certified teacher of Dayan Qigong &mdash; a 1,700 year-old vital energy force practice from China.&nbsp;</p> <p><img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/flight.jpg?sfvrsn=0" displaymode="Original" alt="Flight" title="Flight" class="FloatImageRight" />Through her dance company, Choy teaches her &ldquo;Ki-Flow&rdquo; dance technique, and holds innovative dance courses with an ethnic studies perspective, including Asian American Movement, and Afro-Asian Improv: From Hip Hop to Martial Arts Fusion.&nbsp;</p> <p>After premiering in New York in 2017, Choy will bring &ldquo;Flight&rdquo; for a repeat performance in New York, followed by performances held in Madison. The concert features a diverse ensemble of world-class dancers with training in Asian and Afro-Caribbean martial arts, urban vernacular dance, ballet, and contemporary dance. Performances will include artists Autumn Harms, Yuriko Miyake, Ze Motion, Xavier Townsend, Lacouir Yancey, and Choy herself.&nbsp;</p> <p>This event is co-sponsored by <a href="http://dance.wisc.edu/Feeds/alc.wisc.edu/" title="ALC website" target="_blank">Asian Languages &amp; Cultures</a>, the <a href="https://afroamericanstudies.wisc.edu/" title="Afro-American studies website" target="_blank">Department of Afro-American Studies</a>, the <a href="https://theatre.wisc.edu/" title="Theatre website" target="_blank">Department of Theatre &amp; Drama</a>, <a href="https://mideast.wisc.edu/" title="Middle Eastern studies website" target="_blank">Middle Eastern Studies</a>, and the <a href="https://nelson.wisc.edu/" title="Nelson website" target="_blank">Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies</a>. The concert is made possible through generous funding from the Anonymous Fund and the Evjue Foundation.</p> <p>There will be performances at 8 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 31 and Friday, Nov. 1, as well as at 2:30 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 2. All performances will be held at the Margaret H&rsquo;Doubler Performance Space in Lathrop Hall at 1050 University Ave.</p> <p>Tickets are $22 for the general public and $16 for students and seniors. Advance tickets may be purchased online at <a href="https://artsticketing.wisc.edu" title="Campus Arts Ticketing website" target="_blank">Campus Arts Ticketing</a>, in person at the Campus Arts Box Office at 800 Langdon Street in Madison, or by phone at 608-265-2787. Remaining tickets will be available at the door in Lathrop hall starting one hour before the performance. All tickets are reserved seating.</p>urn:uuid:87b0c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/10/03/burt-to-receive-exemplar-award-from-indiana-university-s-neal-marshall-alumni-club Burt to receive Exemplar Award from Indiana University's Neal-Marshall Alumni ClubUW-Madison’s Brian Burt is receiving the Exemplar Award from Indiana University's Neal-Marshall Alumni Club on Saturday, Oct. 12, at the 24th IU NMAC reunion in Indianapolis. Burt is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis. Thu, 03 Oct 2019 10:25:00 Z<p>UW-Madison&rsquo;s Brian Burt is receiving the Exemplar Award from Indiana University's Neal-Marshall Alumni Club&nbsp;on Saturday, Oct. 12, at the 24<span style="font-size: 10px;">th&nbsp;</span>IU NMAC reunion in Indianapolis.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img title="Brian Burt 250 px SQ" displaymode="Original" alt="Brian Burt" src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/brian-burt-250-px-sq.jpg?sfvrsn=0" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption"> Burt </figcaption> </figure> </div> Burt is an assistant professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a target="_blank" title="ELPA website" href="https://elpa.education.wisc.edu/">Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis</a>. Prior to arriving on the UW-Madison campus for the start of fall semester, he served as an assistant professor at Iowa State University since 2014.&nbsp;</p> <p>His research, which has received major funding from the National Science Foundation and the National Academy of Education/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship, examines policies and practices that influence students&rsquo; educational and workforce pathways. In particular, Burt looks to understand and improve the experiences of black men in STEM graduate programs.</p> <p>Burt was recently featured by Diverse Issues in Higher Education as a &ldquo;2019 Emerging Scholar.&rdquo; <br /> <br /> Burt earned his undergraduate degree from Indiana University in secondary English Education in 2004. He would go on to earn a&nbsp;Ph.D. from the University of Michigan&rsquo;s Center for the Study of Higher and Postsecondary Education in 2014.​</p>urn:uuid:97b0c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/10/02/baldridge-s--reclaiming-community--receives-a-2019-aesa-critics--choice-book-award Baldridge's 'Reclaiming Community' receives a 2019 AESA Critics’ Choice Book AwardThe new book, “Reclaiming Community: Race and the Uncertain Future of Youth Work,” from UW-Madison’s Bianca Baldridge is a 2019 American Educational Studies Association (AESA) Critics’ Choice Book Award winner. Baldridge is a sociologist of education and an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Educational Policy Studies. Wed, 02 Oct 2019 18:16:39 Z<p>The new book, &ldquo;Reclaiming Community: Race and the Uncertain Future of Youth Work,&rdquo; from UW-Madison&rsquo;s Bianca Baldridge is a 2019 American Educational Studies Association (AESA) Critics&rsquo; Choice Book Award winner.&nbsp;</p> <p>Baldridge is a sociologist of education and an assistant professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="https://eps.education.wisc.edu/" title="EPS home page" target="_blank">Department of Educational Policy Studies</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/bianca-baldridge-new-book.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Bianca Baldridge with Reclaiming Community" displaymode="Original" title="Bianca Baldridge new book" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption"> Bianca Baldridge with her recently released book,<br /> "Reclaiming Community."</figcaption> </figure> </div> Each year, a committee of AESA members selects a number of titles it regards as outstanding books that may be of interest to those in educational studies. These books are designated as AESA Critics&rsquo; Choice Award winners and are displayed prominently at the annual meeting.&nbsp;</p> <p>This award serves to recognize and increase awareness of recent scholarship deemed to be outstanding in its field and of potential interest to members of the Association. <br /> <br /> &ldquo;Reclaiming Community&rdquo; tells the story of a community-based program, Educational Excellence (EE), shining a light on the invaluable role youth workers play in such spaces, and the precarious context in which these programs now exist.&nbsp;</p> <p>Approximately 2.4 million black youth participate in after-school programs, which offer a range of support, including academic tutoring, college preparation, political identity development, cultural and emotional support, and even a space to develop strategies and tools for organizing and activism. &nbsp;</p> <p>Drawing on rich ethnographic data, Baldridge contends that the story of EE is representative of a much larger and understudied phenomenon. With the spread of neoliberal ideology and its reliance on racism, these spaces of community support are losing the autonomy that has allowed them to embolden the minds of the youth they serve.</p> <p>Baldridge captures the stories of loss and resistance within this context of immense external political pressure, arguing for the damage caused when the same structural violence that Black youth experience in school starts to occur in the places they go to escape it.</p>urn:uuid:afb0c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/10/02/radical-pedagogy--exhibition-opens-oct--11-in-new-lathrop-gallery-space ‘Radical Pedagogy’ exhibition opens Oct. 11 in new Lathrop Gallery SpaceUW–Madison’s Dance Department is opening a stunning permanent exhibition in Lathrop Hall’s new Gallery Space titled, “Radical Pedagogy: Margaret H’Doubler, Anna Halprin, and American Dance, 1916-Present.” The exhibition was made possible via a generous donation from Jody Gottfried Arnhold ('65) and John Arnhold. The photographs, visual art, and films that fill Lathrop’s Gallery Space bear witness to dance pioneer Margaret H’Doubler’s radical pedagogy and its inherently Midwestern progressivism — when dance became a rigorous academic discipline and the body became the route to scientific inquiry, self-discovery, creativity, and citizenship. Wed, 02 Oct 2019 18:06:23 Z<p>UW&ndash;Madison&rsquo;s <a href="http://dance.wisc.edu" title="Dance website" target="_blank">Dance Department</a> is opening a stunning permanent exhibition in Lathrop Hall&rsquo;s new Gallery Space titled, &ldquo;Radical Pedagogy: Margaret H&rsquo;Doubler, Anna Halprin, and American Dance, 1916-Present.&rdquo;</p> <p>The exhibition, which opens at 4:30 p.m. on Friday, Oct. 11, was made possible via a generous donation from Jody Gottfried Arnhold ('65) and John Arnhold.</p> <p>The photographs, visual art, and films that fill Lathrop&rsquo;s Gallery Space bear witness to dance pioneer Margaret H&rsquo;Doubler&rsquo;s radical pedagogy and its inherently Midwestern progressivism &mdash; when dance became a rigorous academic discipline and the body became the route to scientific inquiry, self-discovery, creativity, and citizenship.&nbsp;</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/radical-pedagogy-2019.png?sfvrsn=0" alt="Radical Pedagogy" displaymode="Original" title="Radical Pedagogy 2019" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">This photo showcases Anna Halprin's &ldquo;Branch Dance,<br /> Halprins&rsquo; Dance Deck, Kentfield, California,&nbsp;1957.&rdquo;<em>&nbsp;</em>Dancers<br /> are A.A. Leath, Ann Halprin and Simone (Forti) Morris.<br /> (PHOTO: Warner Jepson/Estate of Warner Jepson)<br /> </figcaption> </figure> </div> Items selected for the exhibition are drawn from numerous public and private collections that document H&rsquo;Doubler&rsquo;s continued influence across generations of dance artists.</p> <p>&ldquo;Margaret H'Doubler and her colleagues graduated many important artists,&rdquo; said exhibition curator, Ninotchka Bennahum, a professor of dance studies and intellectual history at the University of California, Santa Barbara. &ldquo;In 1926, she was the first to hone an academic curriculum for a BS in physical (dance) education and succeeded in extricating the study of dance from technique and creative practice only to dance education as a rigorous academic discipline.&rdquo;</p> <p>This, Bennahum said, &ldquo;offered students a professional future in dance.&rdquo;&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>That legacy is clearly demonstrated by three prominent dance artists, also featured in this exhibition, each of whom have mobilized H&rsquo;Doubler&rsquo;s radical pedagogy and made remarkable contributions to American cultural history: Anna Halprin (&lsquo;42), Mary Hinkson (&rsquo;46, MS &lsquo;47), and Matt Turney (&rsquo;47).</p> <p>Halprin invented the ordinary body and task-based improvisation as material for a dance, ushering in postmodernism. Hinkson and Turney, co-founders of the Wisconsin Dance Group (1947-1951), became the first black dancers to join the Martha Graham Dance Company.</p> <p>Hinkson was one of Graham&rsquo;s leading dancers while with the company. In 1960, she became the first African-American woman to perform for George Balanchine in roles he created for her at New York City Ballet, she also taught at Juilliard, the High School of Performing Arts and the Alvin Ailey American Dance Center.</p> <p>Turney, who danced for Graham nearly two decades, was noted for her gift of stillness, which she demonstrated eloquently in Graham's &ldquo;Appalachian Spring.&rdquo;</p> <p>Professor Kate Corby, chair of the School of Education&rsquo;s Dance Department who worked in consultation with Bennahum on the exhibition, said it is awe-inspiring to see the roots of dance in higher education &mdash; the UW-Madison's dance legacy &mdash; in the halls of Lathrop.&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;We are beneficiaries of H'Doubler's bold, progressive initiative,&rdquo; she said. &ldquo;Every student who has had the opportunity to study dance in college has done so because of her groundbreaking work and we are grateful to Jody and John Arnhold for their generous gift, making this exhibition possible.&rdquo;</p> <p>Jody Arnhold (&lsquo;65), a dance advocate and educator, and founder of Dance Education Laboratory (DEL) at 92Y said that UW-Madison was the nation&rsquo;s first program to offer a major in dance &ldquo;against all odds.&rdquo;&nbsp;&nbsp;Although she was an English major at UW, she said the dance program &ldquo;inspired (her) to pursue a life in dance education&rdquo; because her &ldquo;heart was and is with H&rsquo;Doubler and her understanding that dance is not just predetermined steps; it&rsquo;s a philosophy, a history, and a way of teaching children to find the artist within.&rdquo;</p> <p>The exhibition is open to the public for viewing during regular Lathrop Hall building hours.</p> <h3>Exhibition Credits</h3> <p><strong>Exhibition Curator:&nbsp;</strong>Ninotchka D. Bennahum, in consultation with Kate Corby<br /> <strong>Photographic Curator:&nbsp;</strong>Ellen Crane<br /> <strong>Installation Design and Graphic Art:&nbsp;</strong>Tim Laun, Scott Goodman, Rollin Fortier<br /> <strong>Filmography:&nbsp;</strong>Fran&ccedil;ois Bernardi, NYPL &ndash; Lincoln Center<br /> <strong>Film artist and performance historian:&nbsp;</strong>Douglas Rosenberg<br /> <strong>Digital Media Installation:&nbsp;</strong>Paul S. Hundal, Adam Wiesenfarth, Lisa Marine, CAT Phan<br /> <strong>Installation:&nbsp;</strong>Seth Klekamp<br /> <strong>Digital Media Transfer:&nbsp;</strong>Boyd Hillestad<br /> <strong>Printing:</strong>Star Printz<br /> <strong>Framing:</strong>Paul Douglas</p> <p><span style="color: #9b7544; font-size: 14px;">Acknowledgements<br /> </span>This exhibition would not have been possible without the vision and generous support of dance educator Jody Gottfried Arnhold ('65) and John Arnhold and the following people and institutions: Anna Halprin, Janet Eilber, Artistic Director, the Martha Graham Dance Company, the Faculty and staff of the Dance Department at UW-Madison, Amy Gilman, Director of the Chazen Art Museum, the University Archives of UW-Madison, the Wisconsin Historical Society, Linda Murray, Dance Curator and Arlene Yu, the Jerome Robbins Dance Division of the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Lincoln Center, the Museum of Art, Design, and Architecture at the University of California, Santa Barbara, Nicole Klanfer, Eric Mills, Irwin Appel and the Department of Theater and Dance, UCSB, and many students and artists involved in the re-staging of an excerpt from Anna Halprin&rsquo;s Parades and Changes (1965). This exhibition would also not have been possible without the extraordinary scholarship of Sally Banes, Professor Emerita of Dance and Theater Studies and Chair of Dance (1992&ndash;1996) at UW-Madison, 1991-2003.</p> <style type="text/css"> p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 12.0px 'Helvetica Neue'} </style>urn:uuid:7fa9c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/10/01/uw-madison-s-fields-co-authors-hippotherapy-report-published-by-the-journal-disability-and-rehabilitation UW-Madison’s Fields co-authors hippotherapy report published by the journal Disability and RehabilitationAlongside lead author Wendy Wood of Colorado State University, UW-Madison’s Beth Fields recently co-authored a report that was featured in the journal Disability and Rehabilitation. Fields is an assistant professor with the School of Education’s Department of Kinesiology. The report is titled, "Hippotherapy: a systematic mapping review of peer-reviewed research, 1980 to 2018."Tue, 01 Oct 2019 10:50:00 Z<p>Alongside lead author Wendy Wood of Colorado State University, UW-Madison&rsquo;s Beth Fields recently co-authored a report that was featured in the journal Disability and Rehabilitation.</p> <p>Fields is an assistant professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a href="http://kinesiology.education.wisc.edu" title="Kinesiology home page" target="_blank">Department of Kinesiology</a>.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/beth_fields_250-px.jpg?sfvrsn=0" alt="Beth Fields" displaymode="Original" title="Beth_Fields_250 px" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Fields </figcaption> </figure> </div> The purpose of their study was to map studies of hippotherapy over 30 years as a guide to future research in practice. To do so, Fields and Wood systematically mapped reviews of hippotherapy research, searching nine databases to produce 3,528 unique records.<br /> <br /> Hippotherapy is the use of horseback riding as a therapeutic or rehabilitative treatment, especially as a means of improving coordination, balance, and strength.<br /> <br /> Fields and Wood found that children with cerebral palsy and physical therapists were most prevalent as participants and providers, respectively. Additionally, they reported that equine movement was hippotherapy&rsquo;s core component and mechanism.&nbsp;</p> <p>From their research, the co-authors concluded that continuing research of complex interventions that integrated hippotherapy was warranted. They recommend that proponents and providers of hippotherapy need to better define and represent the practice, explicate their disciplinary perspectives, and partner to develop an enablement theory of hippotherapy that links improved body functions with improved participation in everyday life and quality of life.<br /> <br /> Read the complete report, titled "Hippotherapy: a systematic mapping review of peer-reviewed research, 1980 to 2018,"&nbsp;<a href="https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09638288.2019.1653997" title="Fields' report" target="_blank">here</a>.</p>urn:uuid:9dafc237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/10/01/nominate-an-outstanding-cooperating-teacher-for-a-rockwell-award Nominate an outstanding cooperating teacher for a Rockwell AwardThe School of Education is seeking nominations for the Rockwell Awards for Cooperating Teachers. These awards recognize excellent teachers who have chosen to pass on their expertise by providing professional experiences for UW-Madison student teachers.Tue, 01 Oct 2019 09:50:00 ZDo you know an outstanding educator who has served UW&ndash;Madison pre-service teachers? <br /> <br /> The School of Education is seeking nominations for the annual Rockwell Awards for Cooperating Teachers. These awards recognize excellent teachers who have chosen to pass on their expertise by providing professional experiences for UW-Madison student teachers.<br /> <br /> <p>Roland and Ruth Rockwell provide four awards of $1,000 each for teachers selected for their contribution to the UW-Madison field experience program.<br /> <br /> Please take the time to nominate an outstanding cooperating teacher in your school that has served UW-Madison pre-service teachers. Cooperating teachers may be nominated by their administrators, peers, university faculty and supervisors, or former student teachers.&nbsp;</p> <p>The nomination deadline for these awards is Tuesday, Oct. 15. Additional information on the nomination process is available at UW-Madison's&nbsp;<a href="https://tec.education.wisc.edu/cooperating-teachers/" title="TEC website" target="_blank">Teacher Education Center</a>.&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://uwmadison.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_5zHrvAPf59AhxHv" title="Online submission form" target="_blank">Submit nominations</a> online by Oct. 15.</p>urn:uuid:8fa9c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/09/30/research-project-to-examine-internships-at-six-historically-black-colleges-and-universities Research project to examine internships at six historically black colleges and universitiesThe Center for Research on College-to-Workforce Transitions (CCWT) — a project at UW‒Madison’s Wisconsin Center for Education Research — is collaborating with the United Negro College Fund’s Career Pathways Initiative and a vocational psychologist to study internship programs at six historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) that have a high population of STEM graduates.Mon, 30 Sep 2019 10:30:00 Z<p>The&nbsp;<a href="http://ccwt.wceruw.org/">Center for Research on College-to-Workforce Transitions (CCWT)</a>&nbsp;&mdash; a project at UW‒Madison&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a href="https://www.wcer.wisc.edu/">Wisconsin Center for Education Research</a>&nbsp;&mdash; is collaborating with the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.uncf.org/cpi">United Negro College Fund&rsquo;s Career Pathways Initiative</a>&nbsp;and a vocational psychologist to study internship programs at six historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) that have a high population of STEM graduates.</p> <p>The $1.5 million NSF-funded longitudinal, mixed-methods study aims to examine students&rsquo; experiences with their internships and how these experiences may impact their future wages, employment status,&nbsp;and vocational self-efficacy. This three-year study will be part of the larger &ldquo;<a href="http://ccwt.wceruw.org/research/projects.html#internship">College Internship Study</a>,&rdquo; launched by CCWT Director&nbsp;<a href="https://www.wcer.wisc.edu/About/Staff/1428">Matt Hora</a>&nbsp;and his team in early 2018&nbsp;that now includes over 14 institutions in the U.S., China, and Japan.</p> <p>According to Hora, colleges and universities are increasingly advocating that their students take internships. &ldquo;They are starting to recognize the role internships play in helping students make the sometimes difficult transition between college and the workforce,&rdquo; he says.</p> <p>However, the quality of internship programs varies greatly, states&nbsp;Hora, an expert on college-to-workforce issues and co-author of the acclaimed book, &ldquo;<a href="https://wcer.wisc.edu/news/detail/hora-receives-national-book-honor">Beyond the Skills Gap</a>.&rdquo; <br /> <br /> &ldquo;At too many institutions, we simply don&rsquo;t know enough about the quality of internships, and if colleges are prepared to support what are effectively complex college-employer partnerships. The field especially lacks insights into how internship programs are structured and experienced in the unique socio-cultural and historical contexts of HBCUs.&rdquo;</p> <p>Another gap in the literature relates to the question of whether all students&mdash;regardless of race, gender or socio-economic status&mdash;have access to internships. &ldquo;Research shows that hiring discrimination continues to be a problem, particularly for African American job seekers. And our own studies have revealed that many students simply cannot take an internship due to work obligations, lack of pay, or limited opportunities in their fields,&rdquo; Hora adds.</p> <p>LaToya Owens, director of Learning and Evaluation for the United Negro College Fund, who is partnering with Hora on this project, says there is a real need in higher education for a study that zeroes in on the actual internship experiences of underrepresented students. &ldquo;We really don&rsquo;t know what types of experiences African American students are having during their internships and how that translates to their ability to transition into the workforce. I believe this study will give us those answers.&rdquo;</p> <p>Using an interdisciplinary approach for this groundbreaking study, Hora has also enlisted the expertise of UW&ndash;Madison's&nbsp;<a href="https://counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/cp/people/faculty/mindi-thompson">Mindi Thompson</a>, a vocational psychologist and associate professor with the School of Education's&nbsp;<a href="http://dance.wisc.edu/Feeds/counselingpsych.education.wisc.edu/" title="Counseling Psych website" target="_blank">Department of Counseling Psychology</a>. Thompson says this first-ever collaboration with Hora, an anthropologist and learning scientist by training, is a perfect marriage of skill sets. &ldquo;My research is about exploring the career and educational development of students, particularly those students who are diverse and underrepresented in some way; Matt brings a deep understanding of internships and job skills through the lens of higher education.&rdquo;</p> <p>Through surveys and focus groups with students, and interviews with employers and career services staff at six HBCUs&mdash;currently including Fayetteville State University in North Carolina, Morgan State University in Maryland, and Clark Atlanta University in Georgia &mdash; the researchers plan to generate rigorous, yet actionable, new insights about what factors contribute to a successful internship experience for African American students in STEM disciplines. &ldquo;There is not a lot of systematic research on college internships in the U.S.,&rdquo; says Thompson, &ldquo;so we are hoping to get a sense of the infrastructure for internships, both on campus and within different organizations that hire interns, to understand what works and what doesn&rsquo;t, and how internships can be designed to better serve students, particularly diverse and underrepresented students.&rdquo;</p> <p>One important component of the study is the controversial topic of paid vs. unpaid internships. &ldquo;Research is clear that paid interns tend to find more value in their internship and have better employment outcomes when they graduate,&rdquo; explains Hora, a strong advocate for paid internships. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s also an ethical issue. Students are under considerable pressure to pay for the rising costs of tuition and living expenses, and we simply shouldn&rsquo;t be asking them to work for free.&rdquo;&nbsp; Plus, says Hora, in a precarious labor market where benefits and job security are increasingly rare, engaging in unpaid labor sets an unfortunate precedent for students, colleges, and employers.</p> <p>This study and other important college internships topics, such as strategies for college-employer partnerships, designing effective learning spaces for 21st century skills and inequalities in the intern economy, will be explored at CCWT&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a href="http://ccwt.wceruw.org/symposium.html" target="_blank">2nd Annual Symposium on College Internship Research</a>, taking place Oct. 23-24 at the Pyle Center on the UW-Madison campus.</p>urn:uuid:97a9c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/09/30/division-of-the-arts-opens-call-for-2020-awards-in-the-creative-arts Division of the Arts opens call for 2020 Awards in the Creative ArtsUW–Madison's Division of the Arts has opened the call for applications for the 2020 Awards in the Creative Arts. The Division of the Arts provides research support to UW-Madison faculty, staff, and students in the arts, and each spring it recognizes achievements and professional service in the arts. The grants awarded support future creative endeavors and research. The deadline to apply is Friday, Nov. 1, at 3 p.m.Mon, 30 Sep 2019 10:06:00 Z<p>UW&ndash;Madison's <a href="https://artsdivision.wisc.edu/" title="Division of the Arts website" target="_blank">Division of the Arts</a> has opened the call for applications for the 2020 Awards in the Creative Arts.</p> <p>The Division of the Arts provides research support to UW-Madison faculty, staff, and students in the arts, and each spring it recognizes achievements and professional service in the arts. The grants awarded support future creative endeavors and research.</p> <p>The awards are divided into three categories: Arts Faculty Research, Arts Faculty and Staff Outreach, and Student Achievement in the Arts.<br /> <br /> Complete details are available via&nbsp;<a href="https://gallery.mailchimp.com/a43281fa3930713756a385086/files/125b1652-4bde-4248-997a-4fe9ffbbcd3b/2020_Arts_Awards_Call.pdf?mc_cid=fc4b13cc50&amp;mc_eid=96710d0e2f" title="Awards info PDF" target="_blank">this document</a>.&nbsp;<br /> <br /> The deadline to apply is Friday, Nov. 1, at 3 p.m.</p>urn:uuid:a7a9c237-c0a5-69e0-ad6d-ff0000cdac6dhttp://dance.wisc.edu/dance/news/2019/09/27/hillman-explains-to-iowa-public-radio-how-key-drivers-of-student-debt-often-receive-little-political-attention Hillman explains to Iowa Public Radio that key drivers of student debt often receive little political attentionUW–Madison’s Nick Hillman, an expert in higher ed finance, explains to Iowa Public Radio how key drivers of student debt often receive little attention from candidates. And while making college affordable is more complicated than providing free tuition, Hillman notes that message is likely to resonate with college graduates and younger voters who are a growing share of the electorate.Fri, 27 Sep 2019 10:30:00 Z<p>A recent report from Iowa Public Radio features thoughts from UW-Madison&rsquo;s Nick Hillman on approaches to making college affordable.</p> <p>Hillman is an expert in higher education finance who is an associate professor with the School of Education&rsquo;s <a target="_blank" title="ELPA website" href="https://elpa.education.wisc.edu/">Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Analysis</a>. He directs the university&rsquo;s <a target="_blank" title="SSTAR Lab website" href="https://sstar.wisc.edu">Student Success Through Applied Research (SSTAR) Lab</a>.</p> <p> <div class="FloatImageRight"> <figure class="IWCWrapper"> <div class="IWCImage"> <img title="Hillman FB SQ" displaymode="Original" alt="Nick Hillman" src="http://dance.wisc.edu/images/WebDispenser/news-and-events/hillman-fb-sq.jpg?sfvrsn=0" /> </div> <figcaption class="IWCCaption">Hillman</figcaption> </figure> </div> According to IPR, the average cost of tuition and fees in Iowa is up 40 percent since 2009. Additionally, state funding has not recovered from cuts suffered during the Great Recession. As Democrats campaign across Iowa, many are offering voters ways to ease the burden of tuition and loans.&nbsp;</p> <p>Proposals range from completely free tuition and cancelled student debt to discounted community college and debt forgiveness. At the top of the field, though, there is a distinct difference in how far candidates would go to make college more affordable, as reported by IPR.</p> <p>Hillman points out that private schools, though they play a significant role in student debt, are often left out of many proposals. According to Hillman, the majority of student loans taken out each year are for private institutions.</p> <p>He also explains that the additional costs of things like housing and child care are also huge drivers of student debt, but receive relatively little attention from candidates. Making college affordable is more complicated than providing free tuition, he tells IPR, but that message is likely to resonate with college graduates and younger voters who are a growing share of the electorate.<br /> <br /> Read the complete Iowa Public Radio report <a target="_blank" title="IPR report" href="https://www.iowapublicradio.org/post/top-democrats-take-different-approaches-make-college-affordable#stream/0">here</a>.</p>